Validation of noncontact cardiorespiratory monitoring using impulse-radio ultra-wideband radar against nocturnal polysomnography

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Abstract

Purpose: Polysomnography (PSG) is a standard diagnostic test for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, PSG requires many skin-contacted sensors to monitor vital signs of patients, which may also hamper patients’ sleep. Because impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar can detect the movements of heart and lungs without contact, it may be utilized for vital sign monitoring during sleep. Therefore, we aimed to verify the accuracy and reliability of the breathing rate (BR) and the heart rate (HR) measured by IR-UWB radar. Method: Data acquisition with PSG and IR-UWB radar was performed simultaneously in 6 healthy volunteers and in 15 patients with suspected OSA. Subjects were divided into 4 groups (normal, mild OSA, moderate OSA, and severe OSA) according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). BRs and HRs obtained from the radar using a software algorithm were compared with the BRs (chest belt) and the HRs (electrocardiography) obtained from the PSG. Results: In normal and in mild OSA, BRs (intraclass correlation coefficients R [ICCR] 0.959 [0.956–0.961] and 0.957 [0.955–0.960], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.927 [0.922–0.931] and 0.926 [0.922–0.931], respectively) measured in the radar showed excellent agreement with those measured in PSG. In moderate and severe OSA, BRs ([ICCR] 0.957 [0.956–0.959] and 0.873 [0.864–0.882], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.907 [0.904–0.910] and 0.799 [0.784–0.812], respectively) from the two methods also agreed well. Conclusions: The IR-UWB radar could accurately measure BRs and HRs in sleeping patients with OSA. Therefore, IR-UWB radar may be utilized as a cardiopulmonary monitor during sleep.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSleep and Breathing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Radar
Polysomnography
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Radio
Vital Signs
Sleep
Apnea
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Healthy Volunteers
Electrocardiography
Respiration
Thorax
Software
Heart Rate
Lung
Skin

Keywords

  • Apnea
  • Cardiopulmonary
  • Monitoring
  • Noncontact
  • Polysomnography
  • Radar

Cite this

@article{47a9f94feebb46428cf13ad289add40d,
title = "Validation of noncontact cardiorespiratory monitoring using impulse-radio ultra-wideband radar against nocturnal polysomnography",
abstract = "Purpose: Polysomnography (PSG) is a standard diagnostic test for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, PSG requires many skin-contacted sensors to monitor vital signs of patients, which may also hamper patients’ sleep. Because impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar can detect the movements of heart and lungs without contact, it may be utilized for vital sign monitoring during sleep. Therefore, we aimed to verify the accuracy and reliability of the breathing rate (BR) and the heart rate (HR) measured by IR-UWB radar. Method: Data acquisition with PSG and IR-UWB radar was performed simultaneously in 6 healthy volunteers and in 15 patients with suspected OSA. Subjects were divided into 4 groups (normal, mild OSA, moderate OSA, and severe OSA) according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). BRs and HRs obtained from the radar using a software algorithm were compared with the BRs (chest belt) and the HRs (electrocardiography) obtained from the PSG. Results: In normal and in mild OSA, BRs (intraclass correlation coefficients R [ICCR] 0.959 [0.956–0.961] and 0.957 [0.955–0.960], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.927 [0.922–0.931] and 0.926 [0.922–0.931], respectively) measured in the radar showed excellent agreement with those measured in PSG. In moderate and severe OSA, BRs ([ICCR] 0.957 [0.956–0.959] and 0.873 [0.864–0.882], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.907 [0.904–0.910] and 0.799 [0.784–0.812], respectively) from the two methods also agreed well. Conclusions: The IR-UWB radar could accurately measure BRs and HRs in sleeping patients with OSA. Therefore, IR-UWB radar may be utilized as a cardiopulmonary monitor during sleep.",
keywords = "Apnea, Cardiopulmonary, Monitoring, Noncontact, Polysomnography, Radar",
author = "Sun Kang and Yonggu Lee and Lim, {Young Hyo} and Park, {Hyun Kyung} and Cho, {Sung Ho} and Cho, {Seok Hyun}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11325-019-01908-1",
language = "English",
journal = "Sleep and Breathing",
issn = "1520-9512",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validation of noncontact cardiorespiratory monitoring using impulse-radio ultra-wideband radar against nocturnal polysomnography

AU - Kang, Sun

AU - Lee, Yonggu

AU - Lim, Young Hyo

AU - Park, Hyun Kyung

AU - Cho, Sung Ho

AU - Cho, Seok Hyun

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Polysomnography (PSG) is a standard diagnostic test for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, PSG requires many skin-contacted sensors to monitor vital signs of patients, which may also hamper patients’ sleep. Because impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar can detect the movements of heart and lungs without contact, it may be utilized for vital sign monitoring during sleep. Therefore, we aimed to verify the accuracy and reliability of the breathing rate (BR) and the heart rate (HR) measured by IR-UWB radar. Method: Data acquisition with PSG and IR-UWB radar was performed simultaneously in 6 healthy volunteers and in 15 patients with suspected OSA. Subjects were divided into 4 groups (normal, mild OSA, moderate OSA, and severe OSA) according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). BRs and HRs obtained from the radar using a software algorithm were compared with the BRs (chest belt) and the HRs (electrocardiography) obtained from the PSG. Results: In normal and in mild OSA, BRs (intraclass correlation coefficients R [ICCR] 0.959 [0.956–0.961] and 0.957 [0.955–0.960], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.927 [0.922–0.931] and 0.926 [0.922–0.931], respectively) measured in the radar showed excellent agreement with those measured in PSG. In moderate and severe OSA, BRs ([ICCR] 0.957 [0.956–0.959] and 0.873 [0.864–0.882], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.907 [0.904–0.910] and 0.799 [0.784–0.812], respectively) from the two methods also agreed well. Conclusions: The IR-UWB radar could accurately measure BRs and HRs in sleeping patients with OSA. Therefore, IR-UWB radar may be utilized as a cardiopulmonary monitor during sleep.

AB - Purpose: Polysomnography (PSG) is a standard diagnostic test for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, PSG requires many skin-contacted sensors to monitor vital signs of patients, which may also hamper patients’ sleep. Because impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar can detect the movements of heart and lungs without contact, it may be utilized for vital sign monitoring during sleep. Therefore, we aimed to verify the accuracy and reliability of the breathing rate (BR) and the heart rate (HR) measured by IR-UWB radar. Method: Data acquisition with PSG and IR-UWB radar was performed simultaneously in 6 healthy volunteers and in 15 patients with suspected OSA. Subjects were divided into 4 groups (normal, mild OSA, moderate OSA, and severe OSA) according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). BRs and HRs obtained from the radar using a software algorithm were compared with the BRs (chest belt) and the HRs (electrocardiography) obtained from the PSG. Results: In normal and in mild OSA, BRs (intraclass correlation coefficients R [ICCR] 0.959 [0.956–0.961] and 0.957 [0.955–0.960], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.927 [0.922–0.931] and 0.926 [0.922–0.931], respectively) measured in the radar showed excellent agreement with those measured in PSG. In moderate and severe OSA, BRs ([ICCR] 0.957 [0.956–0.959] and 0.873 [0.864–0.882], respectively) and HRs ([ICCR] 0.907 [0.904–0.910] and 0.799 [0.784–0.812], respectively) from the two methods also agreed well. Conclusions: The IR-UWB radar could accurately measure BRs and HRs in sleeping patients with OSA. Therefore, IR-UWB radar may be utilized as a cardiopulmonary monitor during sleep.

KW - Apnea

KW - Cardiopulmonary

KW - Monitoring

KW - Noncontact

KW - Polysomnography

KW - Radar

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U2 - 10.1007/s11325-019-01908-1

DO - 10.1007/s11325-019-01908-1

M3 - Article

JO - Sleep and Breathing

JF - Sleep and Breathing

SN - 1520-9512

ER -