Unravelling metabolism and microbial community of a phytobed co-planted with Typha angustifolia and Ipomoea aquatica for biodegradation of doxylamine from wastewater

Jiu Qiang Xiong, Pengfei Cui, Shaoguo Ru, Sanjay P. Govindwar, Mayur B. Kurade, Min Jang, Sang Hyoun Kim, Byong Hun Jeon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pharmaceutical contaminants in environment induce unexpected effects on ecological systems and human; thus, development of efficient technologies for their removal is immensely necessary. In this study, biodegradation and metabolic fate of a frequently found pharmaceutical contaminant, doxylamine by Typha angustifolia and Ipomoea aquatica was investigated. Microbial community of the plant rhizosphere has been identified to understand the important roles of the functional microbes. The plants reduced 48–80.5 % of doxylamine through hydrolysis/dehydroxylation and carbonylation/decarbonylation. A constructed phytobed co-planted with T. angustifolia and I. aquatica removed 77.3 %, 100 %, 83.67 %, and 61.13 % of chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and doxylamine respectively from real wastewater. High-throughput sequencing of soil and rhizosphere indicated that the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria dominated the microbial communities of the phytobed. Current study has demonstrated the applicability of the developed phytobeds for the treatment of doxylamine from municipal wastewater and provide a comprehensive understanding of its metabolism through plant and its rhizospheric microbial communities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number123404
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume401
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021 Jan 5

Keywords

  • Doxylamine
  • Metabolic pathway
  • Pharmaceutical contaminants
  • Phytoremediation
  • Plant-microbiome system

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