Rotavirus infection as a frequent cause of neonatal fever

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Fever rather than diarrhea or vomiting was the most common symptom of neonatal rotavirus (RV) infection in our previous study. We investigated whether RV infection is a major cause of neonatal fever and compared the clinical characteristics of bacterial infection, viral infection and unknown causes of neonatal fever. Method: We reviewed the electronic medical records of 48 newborns aged ≤28 days who were admitted to the Special Care Nursery of Hanyang University Guri Hospital for fever (≥38°C) from 2005 to 2009. All the newborns underwent complete blood count, urinalysis, C-reactive protein, cultures of blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid as well as stool RV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Respiratory virus polymerase chain reaction for cough or rhinorrhea, and stool culture for diarrhea were also done. Results: All the babies were term, with mean age 13 ± 8 days and peak body temperature 38.5 ± 0.5°C. The causes of neonatal fever were viral (44%), bacterial (10%) and unknown (46%). The viral infections included RV (n = 12), enterovirus (n = 6), respiratory syncytial virus (n = 2), and rhinovirus (n = 1). All the rotavirus genotypes were G4P[6]. Only three of 12 RV-infected febrile newborns had diarrhea. The bacterial infections included three cases of urinary tract infection (Escherichia coli, n = 2; Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 1), and two cases of sepsis complicated with meningitis (all Streptococcus agalactiae). Conclusions: RV infection is the most common single cause of neonatal fever. It may be necessary to include stool RV tests for febrile newborns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)366-371
Number of pages6
JournalPediatrics International
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Rotavirus Infections
Fever
Rotavirus
Diarrhea
Virus Diseases
Bacterial Infections
Rhinovirus
Streptococcus agalactiae
Urinalysis
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Blood Cell Count
Nurseries
Enterovirus
Electronic Health Records
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Body Temperature
Meningitis
Cough
Urinary Tract Infections
C-Reactive Protein

Keywords

  • fever
  • newborn
  • rotavirus

Cite this

@article{c9436075998c4c07b05f687c7b71654b,
title = "Rotavirus infection as a frequent cause of neonatal fever",
abstract = "Background: Fever rather than diarrhea or vomiting was the most common symptom of neonatal rotavirus (RV) infection in our previous study. We investigated whether RV infection is a major cause of neonatal fever and compared the clinical characteristics of bacterial infection, viral infection and unknown causes of neonatal fever. Method: We reviewed the electronic medical records of 48 newborns aged ≤28 days who were admitted to the Special Care Nursery of Hanyang University Guri Hospital for fever (≥38°C) from 2005 to 2009. All the newborns underwent complete blood count, urinalysis, C-reactive protein, cultures of blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid as well as stool RV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Respiratory virus polymerase chain reaction for cough or rhinorrhea, and stool culture for diarrhea were also done. Results: All the babies were term, with mean age 13 ± 8 days and peak body temperature 38.5 ± 0.5°C. The causes of neonatal fever were viral (44{\%}), bacterial (10{\%}) and unknown (46{\%}). The viral infections included RV (n = 12), enterovirus (n = 6), respiratory syncytial virus (n = 2), and rhinovirus (n = 1). All the rotavirus genotypes were G4P[6]. Only three of 12 RV-infected febrile newborns had diarrhea. The bacterial infections included three cases of urinary tract infection (Escherichia coli, n = 2; Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 1), and two cases of sepsis complicated with meningitis (all Streptococcus agalactiae). Conclusions: RV infection is the most common single cause of neonatal fever. It may be necessary to include stool RV tests for febrile newborns.",
keywords = "fever, newborn, rotavirus",
author = "Kang, {Ha Na} and Park, {Hyun Kyung} and Lee, {Hyun Ju} and Moon, {Jin Hwa} and Jae-Won Oh and Chang-Ryul Kim",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ped.13504",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "366--371",
journal = "Pediatrics International",
issn = "1328-8067",
number = "4",

}

Rotavirus infection as a frequent cause of neonatal fever. / Kang, Ha Na; Park, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Moon, Jin Hwa; Oh, Jae-Won; Kim, Chang-Ryul.

In: Pediatrics International, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 366-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rotavirus infection as a frequent cause of neonatal fever

AU - Kang, Ha Na

AU - Park, Hyun Kyung

AU - Lee, Hyun Ju

AU - Moon, Jin Hwa

AU - Oh, Jae-Won

AU - Kim, Chang-Ryul

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - Background: Fever rather than diarrhea or vomiting was the most common symptom of neonatal rotavirus (RV) infection in our previous study. We investigated whether RV infection is a major cause of neonatal fever and compared the clinical characteristics of bacterial infection, viral infection and unknown causes of neonatal fever. Method: We reviewed the electronic medical records of 48 newborns aged ≤28 days who were admitted to the Special Care Nursery of Hanyang University Guri Hospital for fever (≥38°C) from 2005 to 2009. All the newborns underwent complete blood count, urinalysis, C-reactive protein, cultures of blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid as well as stool RV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Respiratory virus polymerase chain reaction for cough or rhinorrhea, and stool culture for diarrhea were also done. Results: All the babies were term, with mean age 13 ± 8 days and peak body temperature 38.5 ± 0.5°C. The causes of neonatal fever were viral (44%), bacterial (10%) and unknown (46%). The viral infections included RV (n = 12), enterovirus (n = 6), respiratory syncytial virus (n = 2), and rhinovirus (n = 1). All the rotavirus genotypes were G4P[6]. Only three of 12 RV-infected febrile newborns had diarrhea. The bacterial infections included three cases of urinary tract infection (Escherichia coli, n = 2; Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 1), and two cases of sepsis complicated with meningitis (all Streptococcus agalactiae). Conclusions: RV infection is the most common single cause of neonatal fever. It may be necessary to include stool RV tests for febrile newborns.

AB - Background: Fever rather than diarrhea or vomiting was the most common symptom of neonatal rotavirus (RV) infection in our previous study. We investigated whether RV infection is a major cause of neonatal fever and compared the clinical characteristics of bacterial infection, viral infection and unknown causes of neonatal fever. Method: We reviewed the electronic medical records of 48 newborns aged ≤28 days who were admitted to the Special Care Nursery of Hanyang University Guri Hospital for fever (≥38°C) from 2005 to 2009. All the newborns underwent complete blood count, urinalysis, C-reactive protein, cultures of blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid as well as stool RV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Respiratory virus polymerase chain reaction for cough or rhinorrhea, and stool culture for diarrhea were also done. Results: All the babies were term, with mean age 13 ± 8 days and peak body temperature 38.5 ± 0.5°C. The causes of neonatal fever were viral (44%), bacterial (10%) and unknown (46%). The viral infections included RV (n = 12), enterovirus (n = 6), respiratory syncytial virus (n = 2), and rhinovirus (n = 1). All the rotavirus genotypes were G4P[6]. Only three of 12 RV-infected febrile newborns had diarrhea. The bacterial infections included three cases of urinary tract infection (Escherichia coli, n = 2; Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 1), and two cases of sepsis complicated with meningitis (all Streptococcus agalactiae). Conclusions: RV infection is the most common single cause of neonatal fever. It may be necessary to include stool RV tests for febrile newborns.

KW - fever

KW - newborn

KW - rotavirus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85045757181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ped.13504

DO - 10.1111/ped.13504

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 366

EP - 371

JO - Pediatrics International

JF - Pediatrics International

SN - 1328-8067

IS - 4

ER -