Rapid Influence of Word-Talker Associations on Lexical Access

Jonny Kim, Katie Drager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous work on English and Korean demonstrates that words are more quickly identified as real words when they are produced by a voice congruent with the age of the talkers who are most likely to use the word (Kim, 2016, Laboratory Phonology, 7, 18; Walker & Hay, 2011, Laboratory Phonology, 2, 219–237). However, this previous work presents stimuli blocked by voice, giving the participant ample time to form expectations about the talker and the words that the talker would likely use. To test whether the effect can be observed in the absence of cues to talker age prior to word onset, the current experiment replicates Kim (2016, Laboratory Phonology, 7, 18) but without blocking by talker. Results from the current experiment confirm earlier findings and they demonstrate that the effect can be observed even without the listener having any expectations about the talker prior to hearing the word. We discuss the implications of these results for models of speech perception, suggesting that lexical access is rapidly boosted by socio-indexical phonetic cues that are congruent with socio-indexical lexical information.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)775-786
Number of pages12
JournalTopics in Cognitive Science
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018 Oct 1

Fingerprint

phonology
Cues
Speech Perception
Phonetics
Speech analysis
experiment
Audition
phonetics
listener
Hearing
stimulus
Experiments

Keywords

  • Lexical access
  • Listener expectations
  • Speech perception
  • Talker characteristics

Cite this

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Rapid Influence of Word-Talker Associations on Lexical Access. / Kim, Jonny; Drager, Katie.

In: Topics in Cognitive Science, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.10.2018, p. 775-786.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Kim, Jonny

AU - Drager, Katie

PY - 2018/10/1

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AB - Previous work on English and Korean demonstrates that words are more quickly identified as real words when they are produced by a voice congruent with the age of the talkers who are most likely to use the word (Kim, 2016, Laboratory Phonology, 7, 18; Walker & Hay, 2011, Laboratory Phonology, 2, 219–237). However, this previous work presents stimuli blocked by voice, giving the participant ample time to form expectations about the talker and the words that the talker would likely use. To test whether the effect can be observed in the absence of cues to talker age prior to word onset, the current experiment replicates Kim (2016, Laboratory Phonology, 7, 18) but without blocking by talker. Results from the current experiment confirm earlier findings and they demonstrate that the effect can be observed even without the listener having any expectations about the talker prior to hearing the word. We discuss the implications of these results for models of speech perception, suggesting that lexical access is rapidly boosted by socio-indexical phonetic cues that are congruent with socio-indexical lexical information.

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