Radiological findings of pleural and mediastinal diseases

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Radiological analysis of chest lesions detected on chest radiographs or CT scans begins with their classification into parenchymal, pleural, or extrapleural lesions according to their presumed origin. The mediastinum is divided anatomically into the anterior, middle, and posterior mediastinal compartments, and localizing a mediastinal mass to one of these divisions can facilitate their differential diagnosis. A differential diagnosis of a mediastinal mass is usually based on a number of findings, including its location; the structure from which it is arising; whether it is single, multifocal (involving several different areas or lymph node groups), or diffuse; its size and shape; its attenuation (fatty, fluid, soft-tissue, or a combination of these); the presence of calcification along with its characteristics and amount; and its opacification following the administration of contrast agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)543-553
Number of pages11
JournalTuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005 Jan 1

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Mediastinal Diseases
Pleural Diseases
Differential Diagnosis
Thorax
Mediastinum
Contrast Media
Lymph Nodes

Keywords

  • Mediastinal diseases
  • Mediastinal neoplasms
  • Pleural diseases

Cite this

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abstract = "Radiological analysis of chest lesions detected on chest radiographs or CT scans begins with their classification into parenchymal, pleural, or extrapleural lesions according to their presumed origin. The mediastinum is divided anatomically into the anterior, middle, and posterior mediastinal compartments, and localizing a mediastinal mass to one of these divisions can facilitate their differential diagnosis. A differential diagnosis of a mediastinal mass is usually based on a number of findings, including its location; the structure from which it is arising; whether it is single, multifocal (involving several different areas or lymph node groups), or diffuse; its size and shape; its attenuation (fatty, fluid, soft-tissue, or a combination of these); the presence of calcification along with its characteristics and amount; and its opacification following the administration of contrast agents.",
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Radiological findings of pleural and mediastinal diseases. / Choi, Yo Won.

In: Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.01.2005, p. 543-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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