Prosodic boundary information modulates phonetic categorization

Sahyang Kim, Taehong Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Categorical perception experiments were performed on an English /b-p/ voice onset time (VOT) continuum with native (American English) and non-native (Korean) listeners to examine whether and how phonetic categorization is modulated by prosodic boundary and language experience. Results demonstrated perceptual shifting according to prosodic boundary strength: A longer VOT was required to identify a sound as /p/ after an intonational phrase than a word boundary, regardless of the listeners' language experience. This suggests that segmental perception is modulated by the listeners' computation of an abstract prosodic structure reflected in phonetic cues of phrase-final lengthening and domain-initial strengthening, which are common across languages.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume134
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013 Jul 1

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phonetics
cues
continuums
acoustics
Listeners
Prosodic Boundaries
Language
Voice Onset Time

Cite this

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Prosodic boundary information modulates phonetic categorization. / Kim, Sahyang; Cho, Taehong.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 134, No. 1, 01.07.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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