Practical application of kangaroo mother care in preterm infants

Clinical characteristics and safety of kangaroo mother care

Hyun Kyung Park, Byeong Seon Choi, Seung Jin Lee, In A. Son, In Joon Seol, Hyun Ju Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To determine the clinical characteristics and safety of kangaroo mother care (KMC) according to the gestational age (GA) or postmenstrual age (PMA). Methods: We conducted a prospective clinical study in 31 infants between 25 and 32 weeks' GA. The subjects were categorized into two groups (25-28 weeks' and 29-32 weeks' GA groups) to compare the clinical characteristics associated with KMC. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure and body temperature (BT) were longitudinally assessed for 60 min with respect to the PMA group (29-32 weeks' and 33-36 weeks' PMA groups). Results: The authors analyzed 70 sessions with 31 infants (25-32 weeks' GA, birth weight 760-1740 g, 29-36 weeks' PMA). All infants had statistically significant higher temperatures during KMC than before KMC within clinically acceptable limits (P < 0.001). We found a significantly lower variation of BT in the 25-28 weeks' GA group compared with the 29-32 weeks' GA group at 33-36 weeks' PMA, suggesting accelerated skin maturation in more premature infants (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our intermittent KMC was a safe and feasible method for preterm infants. Notably, at the same PMA, preterm infants in the lower at-birth GA group showed an advanced maturation of thermoregulation compared with those in the higher GA group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-245
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Perinatal Medicine
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Kangaroo-Mother Care Method
Premature Infants
Gestational Age
Age Groups
Safety
Body Temperature
Body Temperature Regulation
Respiratory Rate
Birth Weight
Heart Rate
Parturition
Prospective Studies
Oxygen

Keywords

  • Kangaroo mother care
  • Preterm infants

Cite this

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title = "Practical application of kangaroo mother care in preterm infants: Clinical characteristics and safety of kangaroo mother care",
abstract = "Aim: To determine the clinical characteristics and safety of kangaroo mother care (KMC) according to the gestational age (GA) or postmenstrual age (PMA). Methods: We conducted a prospective clinical study in 31 infants between 25 and 32 weeks' GA. The subjects were categorized into two groups (25-28 weeks' and 29-32 weeks' GA groups) to compare the clinical characteristics associated with KMC. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure and body temperature (BT) were longitudinally assessed for 60 min with respect to the PMA group (29-32 weeks' and 33-36 weeks' PMA groups). Results: The authors analyzed 70 sessions with 31 infants (25-32 weeks' GA, birth weight 760-1740 g, 29-36 weeks' PMA). All infants had statistically significant higher temperatures during KMC than before KMC within clinically acceptable limits (P < 0.001). We found a significantly lower variation of BT in the 25-28 weeks' GA group compared with the 29-32 weeks' GA group at 33-36 weeks' PMA, suggesting accelerated skin maturation in more premature infants (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our intermittent KMC was a safe and feasible method for preterm infants. Notably, at the same PMA, preterm infants in the lower at-birth GA group showed an advanced maturation of thermoregulation compared with those in the higher GA group.",
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Practical application of kangaroo mother care in preterm infants : Clinical characteristics and safety of kangaroo mother care. / Park, Hyun Kyung; Choi, Byeong Seon; Lee, Seung Jin; Son, In A.; Seol, In Joon; Lee, Hyun Ju.

In: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 239-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Park, Hyun Kyung

AU - Choi, Byeong Seon

AU - Lee, Seung Jin

AU - Son, In A.

AU - Seol, In Joon

AU - Lee, Hyun Ju

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N2 - Aim: To determine the clinical characteristics and safety of kangaroo mother care (KMC) according to the gestational age (GA) or postmenstrual age (PMA). Methods: We conducted a prospective clinical study in 31 infants between 25 and 32 weeks' GA. The subjects were categorized into two groups (25-28 weeks' and 29-32 weeks' GA groups) to compare the clinical characteristics associated with KMC. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure and body temperature (BT) were longitudinally assessed for 60 min with respect to the PMA group (29-32 weeks' and 33-36 weeks' PMA groups). Results: The authors analyzed 70 sessions with 31 infants (25-32 weeks' GA, birth weight 760-1740 g, 29-36 weeks' PMA). All infants had statistically significant higher temperatures during KMC than before KMC within clinically acceptable limits (P < 0.001). We found a significantly lower variation of BT in the 25-28 weeks' GA group compared with the 29-32 weeks' GA group at 33-36 weeks' PMA, suggesting accelerated skin maturation in more premature infants (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our intermittent KMC was a safe and feasible method for preterm infants. Notably, at the same PMA, preterm infants in the lower at-birth GA group showed an advanced maturation of thermoregulation compared with those in the higher GA group.

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