Performing self on the witness stand: Stance and relational work in expert witness testimony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Underpinned by the assumption that social categorizations emerge from discursive practices performed within the interactional context, this study examines the discursive process in which an expert witness constructs and negotiates persuasive courtroom accounts. Using insights from the concept of 'footing' and the framework of stance and engagement, this study reveals the ways in which an expert witness calls upon a range of interactional devices to appropriate the desired footing and labeling category. The findings suggest that instead of asserting their dominance and expertise over the interlocutors, experts construct and negotiate their identity by aligning with other participants and establishing a relationship with them. All this is done within the broad constraints of courtroom discourse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-486
Number of pages22
JournalDiscourse and Society
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012 Sep 1

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relational work
testimony
witness
Labeling
expert
expertise
discourse
Interaction
Witness
Expert Witness
Testimony
Stance
Footings
Relational Work

Keywords

  • Courtroom discourse
  • engagement
  • expert witnesses
  • footing
  • identity
  • social categorization
  • stance

Cite this

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Performing self on the witness stand : Stance and relational work in expert witness testimony. / Chaemsaithong, Krisda.

In: Discourse and Society, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.09.2012, p. 465-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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