Pancreas-like extracellular matrix scaffold for successful pancreatic islet transplantation

Min Jun Kim, Dong Yun Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In clinical islet transplantation, intrahepatically transplanted islets are generally rejected by the host's immune response. However, they are also rapidly destroyed by other mechanisms that are unrelated to immune response. For example, isolated islets can lose the natural pancreatic microenvironment during the islet isolation process, leading to islet cell apoptosis and early graft failure. In a normal pancreas, islets are surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and so on. The interactions between islets and these ECM molecules may be very important for islet physiology in the native pancreas. By modulating intracellular signaling pathways, ECM components may play an important role in islet differentiation, proliferation, survival, and insulin secretion. However, the role of ECM molecules in regulation of pancreatic islets is still completely unknown. This article reviews current knowledge of islet-ECM interactions, evaluating the possible use of ECM molecules in improving islet transplantation outcomes. It also discusses several experimental trials of methods for enhancing the viability and functionality of islets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-582
Number of pages8
JournalMacromolecular Research
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Scaffolds
Molecules
Insulin
Physiology
Laminin
Cell death
Fibronectins
Collagen
Grafts
Apoptosis

Keywords

  • diabetes
  • extracellular matrix
  • islet transplantation
  • pancreas-like scaffold

Cite this

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title = "Pancreas-like extracellular matrix scaffold for successful pancreatic islet transplantation",
abstract = "In clinical islet transplantation, intrahepatically transplanted islets are generally rejected by the host's immune response. However, they are also rapidly destroyed by other mechanisms that are unrelated to immune response. For example, isolated islets can lose the natural pancreatic microenvironment during the islet isolation process, leading to islet cell apoptosis and early graft failure. In a normal pancreas, islets are surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and so on. The interactions between islets and these ECM molecules may be very important for islet physiology in the native pancreas. By modulating intracellular signaling pathways, ECM components may play an important role in islet differentiation, proliferation, survival, and insulin secretion. However, the role of ECM molecules in regulation of pancreatic islets is still completely unknown. This article reviews current knowledge of islet-ECM interactions, evaluating the possible use of ECM molecules in improving islet transplantation outcomes. It also discusses several experimental trials of methods for enhancing the viability and functionality of islets.",
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Pancreas-like extracellular matrix scaffold for successful pancreatic islet transplantation. / Kim, Min Jun; Lee, Dong Yun.

In: Macromolecular Research, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.01.2014, p. 575-582.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pancreas-like extracellular matrix scaffold for successful pancreatic islet transplantation

AU - Kim, Min Jun

AU - Lee, Dong Yun

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - In clinical islet transplantation, intrahepatically transplanted islets are generally rejected by the host's immune response. However, they are also rapidly destroyed by other mechanisms that are unrelated to immune response. For example, isolated islets can lose the natural pancreatic microenvironment during the islet isolation process, leading to islet cell apoptosis and early graft failure. In a normal pancreas, islets are surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and so on. The interactions between islets and these ECM molecules may be very important for islet physiology in the native pancreas. By modulating intracellular signaling pathways, ECM components may play an important role in islet differentiation, proliferation, survival, and insulin secretion. However, the role of ECM molecules in regulation of pancreatic islets is still completely unknown. This article reviews current knowledge of islet-ECM interactions, evaluating the possible use of ECM molecules in improving islet transplantation outcomes. It also discusses several experimental trials of methods for enhancing the viability and functionality of islets.

AB - In clinical islet transplantation, intrahepatically transplanted islets are generally rejected by the host's immune response. However, they are also rapidly destroyed by other mechanisms that are unrelated to immune response. For example, isolated islets can lose the natural pancreatic microenvironment during the islet isolation process, leading to islet cell apoptosis and early graft failure. In a normal pancreas, islets are surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and so on. The interactions between islets and these ECM molecules may be very important for islet physiology in the native pancreas. By modulating intracellular signaling pathways, ECM components may play an important role in islet differentiation, proliferation, survival, and insulin secretion. However, the role of ECM molecules in regulation of pancreatic islets is still completely unknown. This article reviews current knowledge of islet-ECM interactions, evaluating the possible use of ECM molecules in improving islet transplantation outcomes. It also discusses several experimental trials of methods for enhancing the viability and functionality of islets.

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