Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients

Cheol Kim Byeong Cheol Kim, Seop Moon Doo Seop Moon, Mi Yoon Su Mi Yoon, Chul Yang Seok Chul Yang, Ho Joo Yoon, Ho Shin Dong Ho Shin, Soo Park Sung Soo Park, Hee Lee Jung Hee Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a common tumor with a poor prognosis. Of all malignancies, it is the main cause of death for male and female patients in the Western world. Resection remains the most effective treatment when feasible. Accurate description and classification of the extent of cancer growth are important in planning treatment, estimating prognosis, evaluating end results of therapy, and exchanging information on human cancer research. Until effective systemic therapy is available for non- small cell lung cancer, development of new treatment strategies depends on knowledge of the end results achieved for carefully staged groups of patients in the lung cancer populations. For these reasons, we investigated the survival rate in radically resected non-small cell lung cancer patients by newly revised staging system adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer and the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer. Methods: Clinical, surgical-pathologic and follow-up informations on 84 consecutive, previously untreated, patients who received their primary treatment for non-small cell lung cancer were investigated. Staging definitions for the T(primary tumor), N(reginal lymph node), and M(distant metastasis) components were according to the International Staging System for Lung Cancer. Death from any causes was the primary target of the evaluation. Results: The median survival rates were as follows; stage I; 79.1 months, stage II; 47.3 months, stage III a; 22.7 months, stage III b; 16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months versus newly revised stage I a; 58.5 months, stage I b; 76.0 months, stage II a; not available, stage II b; 43.0 months, stage III a; 22.5 months, stage III b;16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months. The survival rates were not significantly different between old and newly revised staging system. Cumulative percent survival at 36months after treatment was 100% in stage I a, 80% in stage I b, not available in stage II a, 26% in stage II b, and 21% in stage III a respectively. Conclusions: Although these data were not significantly different statistically, the newly revised lung cancer staging system might be more promising for the accurate evaluation of the prognosis in the non-small cell lung caner patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-346
Number of pages8
JournalTuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
Volume47
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Neoplasm Staging
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Lung Neoplasms
Survival
Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Therapeutics
Cause of Death
Western World
Lymph Nodes
Neoplasm Metastasis
Lung
Growth
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Newly revised staging system for lung cancer
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Survival

Cite this

Byeong Cheol Kim, C. K., Doo Seop Moon, S. M., Su Mi Yoon, M. Y., Seok Chul Yang, C. Y., Yoon, H. J., Dong Ho Shin, H. S., ... Jung Hee Lee, H. L. (1999). Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, 47(3), 339-346.
Byeong Cheol Kim, Cheol Kim ; Doo Seop Moon, Seop Moon ; Su Mi Yoon, Mi Yoon ; Seok Chul Yang, Chul Yang ; Yoon, Ho Joo ; Dong Ho Shin, Ho Shin ; Sung Soo Park, Soo Park ; Jung Hee Lee, Hee Lee. / Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients. In: Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 339-346.
@article{35b898001d764494b4e4cd812a85440f,
title = "Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients",
abstract = "Background: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a common tumor with a poor prognosis. Of all malignancies, it is the main cause of death for male and female patients in the Western world. Resection remains the most effective treatment when feasible. Accurate description and classification of the extent of cancer growth are important in planning treatment, estimating prognosis, evaluating end results of therapy, and exchanging information on human cancer research. Until effective systemic therapy is available for non- small cell lung cancer, development of new treatment strategies depends on knowledge of the end results achieved for carefully staged groups of patients in the lung cancer populations. For these reasons, we investigated the survival rate in radically resected non-small cell lung cancer patients by newly revised staging system adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer and the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer. Methods: Clinical, surgical-pathologic and follow-up informations on 84 consecutive, previously untreated, patients who received their primary treatment for non-small cell lung cancer were investigated. Staging definitions for the T(primary tumor), N(reginal lymph node), and M(distant metastasis) components were according to the International Staging System for Lung Cancer. Death from any causes was the primary target of the evaluation. Results: The median survival rates were as follows; stage I; 79.1 months, stage II; 47.3 months, stage III a; 22.7 months, stage III b; 16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months versus newly revised stage I a; 58.5 months, stage I b; 76.0 months, stage II a; not available, stage II b; 43.0 months, stage III a; 22.5 months, stage III b;16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months. The survival rates were not significantly different between old and newly revised staging system. Cumulative percent survival at 36months after treatment was 100{\%} in stage I a, 80{\%} in stage I b, not available in stage II a, 26{\%} in stage II b, and 21{\%} in stage III a respectively. Conclusions: Although these data were not significantly different statistically, the newly revised lung cancer staging system might be more promising for the accurate evaluation of the prognosis in the non-small cell lung caner patients.",
keywords = "Newly revised staging system for lung cancer, Non-small cell lung cancer, Survival",
author = "{Byeong Cheol Kim}, {Cheol Kim} and {Doo Seop Moon}, {Seop Moon} and {Su Mi Yoon}, {Mi Yoon} and {Seok Chul Yang}, {Chul Yang} and Yoon, {Ho Joo} and {Dong Ho Shin}, {Ho Shin} and {Sung Soo Park}, {Soo Park} and {Jung Hee Lee}, {Hee Lee}",
year = "1999",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "339--346",
journal = "Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases",
issn = "1738-3536",
number = "3",

}

Byeong Cheol Kim, CK, Doo Seop Moon, SM, Su Mi Yoon, MY, Seok Chul Yang, CY, Yoon, HJ, Dong Ho Shin, HS, Sung Soo Park, SP & Jung Hee Lee, HL 1999, 'Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients', Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 339-346.

Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients. / Byeong Cheol Kim, Cheol Kim; Doo Seop Moon, Seop Moon; Su Mi Yoon, Mi Yoon; Seok Chul Yang, Chul Yang; Yoon, Ho Joo; Dong Ho Shin, Ho Shin; Sung Soo Park, Soo Park; Jung Hee Lee, Hee Lee.

In: Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, Vol. 47, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 339-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients

AU - Byeong Cheol Kim, Cheol Kim

AU - Doo Seop Moon, Seop Moon

AU - Su Mi Yoon, Mi Yoon

AU - Seok Chul Yang, Chul Yang

AU - Yoon, Ho Joo

AU - Dong Ho Shin, Ho Shin

AU - Sung Soo Park, Soo Park

AU - Jung Hee Lee, Hee Lee

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - Background: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a common tumor with a poor prognosis. Of all malignancies, it is the main cause of death for male and female patients in the Western world. Resection remains the most effective treatment when feasible. Accurate description and classification of the extent of cancer growth are important in planning treatment, estimating prognosis, evaluating end results of therapy, and exchanging information on human cancer research. Until effective systemic therapy is available for non- small cell lung cancer, development of new treatment strategies depends on knowledge of the end results achieved for carefully staged groups of patients in the lung cancer populations. For these reasons, we investigated the survival rate in radically resected non-small cell lung cancer patients by newly revised staging system adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer and the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer. Methods: Clinical, surgical-pathologic and follow-up informations on 84 consecutive, previously untreated, patients who received their primary treatment for non-small cell lung cancer were investigated. Staging definitions for the T(primary tumor), N(reginal lymph node), and M(distant metastasis) components were according to the International Staging System for Lung Cancer. Death from any causes was the primary target of the evaluation. Results: The median survival rates were as follows; stage I; 79.1 months, stage II; 47.3 months, stage III a; 22.7 months, stage III b; 16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months versus newly revised stage I a; 58.5 months, stage I b; 76.0 months, stage II a; not available, stage II b; 43.0 months, stage III a; 22.5 months, stage III b;16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months. The survival rates were not significantly different between old and newly revised staging system. Cumulative percent survival at 36months after treatment was 100% in stage I a, 80% in stage I b, not available in stage II a, 26% in stage II b, and 21% in stage III a respectively. Conclusions: Although these data were not significantly different statistically, the newly revised lung cancer staging system might be more promising for the accurate evaluation of the prognosis in the non-small cell lung caner patients.

AB - Background: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a common tumor with a poor prognosis. Of all malignancies, it is the main cause of death for male and female patients in the Western world. Resection remains the most effective treatment when feasible. Accurate description and classification of the extent of cancer growth are important in planning treatment, estimating prognosis, evaluating end results of therapy, and exchanging information on human cancer research. Until effective systemic therapy is available for non- small cell lung cancer, development of new treatment strategies depends on knowledge of the end results achieved for carefully staged groups of patients in the lung cancer populations. For these reasons, we investigated the survival rate in radically resected non-small cell lung cancer patients by newly revised staging system adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer and the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer. Methods: Clinical, surgical-pathologic and follow-up informations on 84 consecutive, previously untreated, patients who received their primary treatment for non-small cell lung cancer were investigated. Staging definitions for the T(primary tumor), N(reginal lymph node), and M(distant metastasis) components were according to the International Staging System for Lung Cancer. Death from any causes was the primary target of the evaluation. Results: The median survival rates were as follows; stage I; 79.1 months, stage II; 47.3 months, stage III a; 22.7 months, stage III b; 16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months versus newly revised stage I a; 58.5 months, stage I b; 76.0 months, stage II a; not available, stage II b; 43.0 months, stage III a; 22.5 months, stage III b;16.1 months, and stage IV; 15.2 months. The survival rates were not significantly different between old and newly revised staging system. Cumulative percent survival at 36months after treatment was 100% in stage I a, 80% in stage I b, not available in stage II a, 26% in stage II b, and 21% in stage III a respectively. Conclusions: Although these data were not significantly different statistically, the newly revised lung cancer staging system might be more promising for the accurate evaluation of the prognosis in the non-small cell lung caner patients.

KW - Newly revised staging system for lung cancer

KW - Non-small cell lung cancer

KW - Survival

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032700516&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0032700516

VL - 47

SP - 339

EP - 346

JO - Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases

JF - Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases

SN - 1738-3536

IS - 3

ER -

Byeong Cheol Kim CK, Doo Seop Moon SM, Su Mi Yoon MY, Seok Chul Yang CY, Yoon HJ, Dong Ho Shin HS et al. Newly revised lung cancer staging system and survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases. 1999 Jan 1;47(3):339-346.