Is the graft function of living donor renal transplants associated with renal mass matching by computed tomography angiographic volumetry?

J. Y. Choi, Oh Jung Kwon

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Abstract

Background Donor renal volume, which can be easily measured by computerized tomographic angiography with 3-dimensional reconstruction, may influence graft outcomes. Low functional renal mass and donor kidney-recipient body size mismatch can lead to progressive renal injury and poor graft function. Materials and methods This single-center retrospective analysis of 51 consecutive living donor renal transplantations performed between January 2005 and December 2011 defined transplant renal volume per unit recipient body surface area (BSA; mL/m 2 ). The patients were divided into 2 groups: group I (n = 31, donor-recipient BSA ratio ≤1) and group II (n = 20, BSA ratio >1). We analyzed the clinical characteristics and laboratory data of donors and recipients to ascertain correlations with, renal volumes and graft outcomes. Results The renal volumes of living donors correlated with estimated glomerular filtration ratios (eGFR; r =.314, P =.025). Serum creatinine after renal transplantation correlated with transplanted renal volume at 1, 3, and 12 months (r = -.319, P =.048; r = -.407, P =.010; r = -.472, P =.002). Serum eGFR also correlated with transplanted renal volume at 3 and 12 months after renal transplantation (r =.318, P =.049 and r =.388, P =.015). There were no significant differences between groups for acute or chronic rejection, infection or delayed graft function. However, serum creatinine levels were higher (P =.011, P =.022, and P =.007) and serum eGFR significantly lower in group I at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after renal transplantation (P =.036, P =.042, P =.042, and P =.049, respectively). There was no significant difference in graft survival. Conclusions Renal volume of living donors may reflect renal function and have a significant impact on graft outcomes. Renal volume matching should be considered to select donor-recipient pairs for living donor renal transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2919-2924
Number of pages6
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013 Oct 1

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Living Donors
Tomography
Transplants
Kidney
Kidney Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Serum
Creatinine
Delayed Graft Function
Body Surface Area
Body Size
Graft Survival
Angiography

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@article{c7130367834345228811e04021b3b439,
title = "Is the graft function of living donor renal transplants associated with renal mass matching by computed tomography angiographic volumetry?",
abstract = "Background Donor renal volume, which can be easily measured by computerized tomographic angiography with 3-dimensional reconstruction, may influence graft outcomes. Low functional renal mass and donor kidney-recipient body size mismatch can lead to progressive renal injury and poor graft function. Materials and methods This single-center retrospective analysis of 51 consecutive living donor renal transplantations performed between January 2005 and December 2011 defined transplant renal volume per unit recipient body surface area (BSA; mL/m 2 ). The patients were divided into 2 groups: group I (n = 31, donor-recipient BSA ratio ≤1) and group II (n = 20, BSA ratio >1). We analyzed the clinical characteristics and laboratory data of donors and recipients to ascertain correlations with, renal volumes and graft outcomes. Results The renal volumes of living donors correlated with estimated glomerular filtration ratios (eGFR; r =.314, P =.025). Serum creatinine after renal transplantation correlated with transplanted renal volume at 1, 3, and 12 months (r = -.319, P =.048; r = -.407, P =.010; r = -.472, P =.002). Serum eGFR also correlated with transplanted renal volume at 3 and 12 months after renal transplantation (r =.318, P =.049 and r =.388, P =.015). There were no significant differences between groups for acute or chronic rejection, infection or delayed graft function. However, serum creatinine levels were higher (P =.011, P =.022, and P =.007) and serum eGFR significantly lower in group I at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after renal transplantation (P =.036, P =.042, P =.042, and P =.049, respectively). There was no significant difference in graft survival. Conclusions Renal volume of living donors may reflect renal function and have a significant impact on graft outcomes. Renal volume matching should be considered to select donor-recipient pairs for living donor renal transplantation.",
author = "Choi, {J. Y.} and Kwon, {Oh Jung}",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.08.045",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "2919--2924",
journal = "Transplantation Proceedings",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Is the graft function of living donor renal transplants associated with renal mass matching by computed tomography angiographic volumetry?

AU - Choi, J. Y.

AU - Kwon, Oh Jung

PY - 2013/10/1

Y1 - 2013/10/1

N2 - Background Donor renal volume, which can be easily measured by computerized tomographic angiography with 3-dimensional reconstruction, may influence graft outcomes. Low functional renal mass and donor kidney-recipient body size mismatch can lead to progressive renal injury and poor graft function. Materials and methods This single-center retrospective analysis of 51 consecutive living donor renal transplantations performed between January 2005 and December 2011 defined transplant renal volume per unit recipient body surface area (BSA; mL/m 2 ). The patients were divided into 2 groups: group I (n = 31, donor-recipient BSA ratio ≤1) and group II (n = 20, BSA ratio >1). We analyzed the clinical characteristics and laboratory data of donors and recipients to ascertain correlations with, renal volumes and graft outcomes. Results The renal volumes of living donors correlated with estimated glomerular filtration ratios (eGFR; r =.314, P =.025). Serum creatinine after renal transplantation correlated with transplanted renal volume at 1, 3, and 12 months (r = -.319, P =.048; r = -.407, P =.010; r = -.472, P =.002). Serum eGFR also correlated with transplanted renal volume at 3 and 12 months after renal transplantation (r =.318, P =.049 and r =.388, P =.015). There were no significant differences between groups for acute or chronic rejection, infection or delayed graft function. However, serum creatinine levels were higher (P =.011, P =.022, and P =.007) and serum eGFR significantly lower in group I at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after renal transplantation (P =.036, P =.042, P =.042, and P =.049, respectively). There was no significant difference in graft survival. Conclusions Renal volume of living donors may reflect renal function and have a significant impact on graft outcomes. Renal volume matching should be considered to select donor-recipient pairs for living donor renal transplantation.

AB - Background Donor renal volume, which can be easily measured by computerized tomographic angiography with 3-dimensional reconstruction, may influence graft outcomes. Low functional renal mass and donor kidney-recipient body size mismatch can lead to progressive renal injury and poor graft function. Materials and methods This single-center retrospective analysis of 51 consecutive living donor renal transplantations performed between January 2005 and December 2011 defined transplant renal volume per unit recipient body surface area (BSA; mL/m 2 ). The patients were divided into 2 groups: group I (n = 31, donor-recipient BSA ratio ≤1) and group II (n = 20, BSA ratio >1). We analyzed the clinical characteristics and laboratory data of donors and recipients to ascertain correlations with, renal volumes and graft outcomes. Results The renal volumes of living donors correlated with estimated glomerular filtration ratios (eGFR; r =.314, P =.025). Serum creatinine after renal transplantation correlated with transplanted renal volume at 1, 3, and 12 months (r = -.319, P =.048; r = -.407, P =.010; r = -.472, P =.002). Serum eGFR also correlated with transplanted renal volume at 3 and 12 months after renal transplantation (r =.318, P =.049 and r =.388, P =.015). There were no significant differences between groups for acute or chronic rejection, infection or delayed graft function. However, serum creatinine levels were higher (P =.011, P =.022, and P =.007) and serum eGFR significantly lower in group I at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after renal transplantation (P =.036, P =.042, P =.042, and P =.049, respectively). There was no significant difference in graft survival. Conclusions Renal volume of living donors may reflect renal function and have a significant impact on graft outcomes. Renal volume matching should be considered to select donor-recipient pairs for living donor renal transplantation.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.08.045

DO - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.08.045

M3 - Article

C2 - 24157004

AN - SCOPUS:84886263317

VL - 45

SP - 2919

EP - 2924

JO - Transplantation Proceedings

JF - Transplantation Proceedings

SN - 0041-1345

IS - 8

ER -