Industrial agglomeration and the regional scientific explanation of perceived environmental injustice

William M. Bowen, Mark Atlas, Sugie Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article evaluates the impact on an environmental justice analysis of explicitly controlling for forces of agglomeration. Many environmental justice studies have examined whether polluting facilities are disproportionately concentrated near certain types of people, such as minorities. No studies so far have explicitly included a proxy for agglomeration, and relatively few use appropriate spatial analytic techniques. Our analysis does both, and in doing so demonstrates that agglomeration is an important factor explaining locations of certain environmentally regulated facilities. Not using fundamental regional science concepts and appropriate spatial analytic techniques can lead to flawed analyses and conclusions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1013-1031
Number of pages19
JournalAnnals of Regional Science
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009 Oct 1

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industrial agglomeration
agglomeration
agglomeration area
environmental justice
justice
location factors
minority
science
analysis

Cite this

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Industrial agglomeration and the regional scientific explanation of perceived environmental injustice. / Bowen, William M.; Atlas, Mark; Lee, Sugie.

In: Annals of Regional Science, Vol. 43, No. 4, 01.10.2009, p. 1013-1031.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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