Hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaics

Ganesan Mohan Kumar, Siva Chidambaram, Jin Kawakita, Park Jinsub, Ramasamy Jayavel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Harvesting energy directly from sunlight using photovoltaic (PV) technology is well recognized as an essential component for the future global energy requirements. PV based devices are nowadays considered to be economically competitive on par with the other fossil fuels or renewable energy technologies. In addition, the large-scale production of these devices (as a sustainable energy source) could help us to meet a significant portion of our daily energy requirements. These devices were extensively studied since 1950s, when the first crystalline silicon solar cell (efficiency 6%) was developed at Bell Laboratories [1]. Over these years, solar cells have been made from many other semiconducting materials with various device configurations such as single-crystal, polycrystalline, and amorphous thin-film structures [2].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNanostructure, Nanosystems, and Nanostructured Materials
Subtitle of host publicationTheory, Production and Development
PublisherApple Academic Press
Pages461-486
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9781482203554
ISBN (Print)9781926895499
StatePublished - 2013 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
Energy harvesting
Silicon solar cells
Amorphous films
Fossil fuels
Solar cells
Single crystals
Crystalline materials
Thin films

Keywords

  • Electropolymerization reactions
  • Hybrid solar cells
  • Hydrothermal synthesis
  • Oxide nanorods
  • Photovoltaic technology

Cite this

Kumar, G. M., Chidambaram, S., Kawakita, J., Jinsub, P., & Jayavel, R. (2013). Hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaics. In Nanostructure, Nanosystems, and Nanostructured Materials: Theory, Production and Development (pp. 461-486). Apple Academic Press.
Kumar, Ganesan Mohan ; Chidambaram, Siva ; Kawakita, Jin ; Jinsub, Park ; Jayavel, Ramasamy. / Hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaics. Nanostructure, Nanosystems, and Nanostructured Materials: Theory, Production and Development. Apple Academic Press, 2013. pp. 461-486
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Kumar, GM, Chidambaram, S, Kawakita, J, Jinsub, P & Jayavel, R 2013, Hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaics. in Nanostructure, Nanosystems, and Nanostructured Materials: Theory, Production and Development. Apple Academic Press, pp. 461-486.

Hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaics. / Kumar, Ganesan Mohan; Chidambaram, Siva; Kawakita, Jin; Jinsub, Park; Jayavel, Ramasamy.

Nanostructure, Nanosystems, and Nanostructured Materials: Theory, Production and Development. Apple Academic Press, 2013. p. 461-486.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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T1 - Hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaics

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AU - Jinsub, Park

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KW - Hybrid solar cells

KW - Hydrothermal synthesis

KW - Oxide nanorods

KW - Photovoltaic technology

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BT - Nanostructure, Nanosystems, and Nanostructured Materials

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Kumar GM, Chidambaram S, Kawakita J, Jinsub P, Jayavel R. Hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaics. In Nanostructure, Nanosystems, and Nanostructured Materials: Theory, Production and Development. Apple Academic Press. 2013. p. 461-486