Fabrication of electrically controllable microlens array using liquid crystals

Jae-Hoon Kim, Satyendra Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrically controllable liquid-crystal (LC) microlens arrays have been fabricated using the process of anisotropic phase separation of the LC from its solution in a ultraviolet curable prepolymer. The focal length of nematic LC-based microlens arrays can be changed in milliseconds with an applied electric field. The ferroelectric LC microlens array exhibits the memory effect and modulates the transmitted light within a few microseconds, i.e., ∼ 1000 times faster than the nematic LC-based microlens. Having no internal substructures to scatter light, these devices offer high efficiency and high light throughput that is different from polymer-dispersed devices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)628-632
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Lightwave Technology
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005 Feb 1

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liquid crystals
fabrication
prepolymers
substructures
electric fields
polymers

Keywords

  • Anisotropic phase separation
  • Liquid crystal (LC)
  • Memory effect
  • Microlens array

Cite this

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Fabrication of electrically controllable microlens array using liquid crystals. / Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kumar, Satyendra.

In: Journal of Lightwave Technology, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 628-632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kumar, Satyendra

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AB - Electrically controllable liquid-crystal (LC) microlens arrays have been fabricated using the process of anisotropic phase separation of the LC from its solution in a ultraviolet curable prepolymer. The focal length of nematic LC-based microlens arrays can be changed in milliseconds with an applied electric field. The ferroelectric LC microlens array exhibits the memory effect and modulates the transmitted light within a few microseconds, i.e., ∼ 1000 times faster than the nematic LC-based microlens. Having no internal substructures to scatter light, these devices offer high efficiency and high light throughput that is different from polymer-dispersed devices.

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