Effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth ventilation after video self-instruction training in laypersons

Hyuk J. Choi, Christopher C. Lee, Tae H. Lim, Bo S. Kang, Adam J. Singer, Mark C. Henry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Mouth-to-mouth ventilation is a skill taught in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training for laypersons. However, its effectiveness is questioned. Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth ventilation training using a self-instruction CPR training video for laypersons. Methods: Video-self-instruction CPR training was conducted with CPR Anytime (American Heart Association [AHA] & Laerdal Corporation) for laypersons who had not received CPR training during the recent 5 years. Immediately before, immediately after, and 8 weeks after the CPR training, an AHA basic life support instructor carried out a skill performance test using a standardized checklist. Also, 8 weeks after the training, a skill test concerning chest compression and mouth-to-mouth ventilation was conducted using a trained reporter. Results: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training of 84 laypersons was conducted. The mean performance score (from 0 to 2) for mouth-to-mouth ventilation was 0.24 right before the training, 1.58 right after the training, and 0.95 eight weeks after the training. The mean performance scores for chest compression were 0.13, 1.79, and 1.40, right before, right after, and 8 weeks after the CPR training, respectively. The rates of successful mouth-to-mouth ventilation and compression were 11.9%, and 39.1%, respectively. Conclusions: The effectiveness and short-term retention rate of mouth-to-mouth ventilation after video self-instruction CPR training in laypersons was significantly lower than for chest compressions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)654-657
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010 Jul 1

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title = "Effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth ventilation after video self-instruction training in laypersons",
abstract = "Background: Mouth-to-mouth ventilation is a skill taught in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training for laypersons. However, its effectiveness is questioned. Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth ventilation training using a self-instruction CPR training video for laypersons. Methods: Video-self-instruction CPR training was conducted with CPR Anytime (American Heart Association [AHA] & Laerdal Corporation) for laypersons who had not received CPR training during the recent 5 years. Immediately before, immediately after, and 8 weeks after the CPR training, an AHA basic life support instructor carried out a skill performance test using a standardized checklist. Also, 8 weeks after the training, a skill test concerning chest compression and mouth-to-mouth ventilation was conducted using a trained reporter. Results: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training of 84 laypersons was conducted. The mean performance score (from 0 to 2) for mouth-to-mouth ventilation was 0.24 right before the training, 1.58 right after the training, and 0.95 eight weeks after the training. The mean performance scores for chest compression were 0.13, 1.79, and 1.40, right before, right after, and 8 weeks after the CPR training, respectively. The rates of successful mouth-to-mouth ventilation and compression were 11.9{\%}, and 39.1{\%}, respectively. Conclusions: The effectiveness and short-term retention rate of mouth-to-mouth ventilation after video self-instruction CPR training in laypersons was significantly lower than for chest compressions.",
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Effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth ventilation after video self-instruction training in laypersons. / Choi, Hyuk J.; Lee, Christopher C.; Lim, Tae H.; Kang, Bo S.; Singer, Adam J.; Henry, Mark C.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 6, 01.07.2010, p. 654-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth ventilation after video self-instruction training in laypersons

AU - Choi, Hyuk J.

AU - Lee, Christopher C.

AU - Lim, Tae H.

AU - Kang, Bo S.

AU - Singer, Adam J.

AU - Henry, Mark C.

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N2 - Background: Mouth-to-mouth ventilation is a skill taught in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training for laypersons. However, its effectiveness is questioned. Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of mouth-to-mouth ventilation training using a self-instruction CPR training video for laypersons. Methods: Video-self-instruction CPR training was conducted with CPR Anytime (American Heart Association [AHA] & Laerdal Corporation) for laypersons who had not received CPR training during the recent 5 years. Immediately before, immediately after, and 8 weeks after the CPR training, an AHA basic life support instructor carried out a skill performance test using a standardized checklist. Also, 8 weeks after the training, a skill test concerning chest compression and mouth-to-mouth ventilation was conducted using a trained reporter. Results: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training of 84 laypersons was conducted. The mean performance score (from 0 to 2) for mouth-to-mouth ventilation was 0.24 right before the training, 1.58 right after the training, and 0.95 eight weeks after the training. The mean performance scores for chest compression were 0.13, 1.79, and 1.40, right before, right after, and 8 weeks after the CPR training, respectively. The rates of successful mouth-to-mouth ventilation and compression were 11.9%, and 39.1%, respectively. Conclusions: The effectiveness and short-term retention rate of mouth-to-mouth ventilation after video self-instruction CPR training in laypersons was significantly lower than for chest compressions.

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