Distribution of trace elements in flowing surface waters: Effect of seasons and anthropogenic practices in India

Rahul Kumar, Manviri Rani, Himanshu Gupta, Bina Gupta, Daeryong Park, Byong Hun Jeon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study reports the distribution of Cr, Ni, Cu and Pb in waters, sediments, macrophytes and fish of the Yamuna River’s patch in Delhi (India). This is one of the most polluted stretches of rivers in the world. Water from this river is used fosr irrigation, industrial and domestic purposes, including drinking water. The effects of season and anthropogenic practices were identified. Almost zero dissolved oxygen and high levels of lead and phosphate indicate the polluted state of the aquatic system. The enrichment factors in sediments (with respect to reference site) vary in the range of 0.60–82.9% (Cr), 1.40–90.5% (Ni), 1.00–85.3% (Cu) and 3.80–86.6% (Pb). The toxic effects due to Ni and Pb could frequently be visible in aquatic life as their values fall above the probable effect level (36 mg Kg−1 for Ni and 91.3 mg Kg−1 for Pb). The metal contents in the macrophyte (Eichhornia crassipes) and the fish (Oreochromis niloticus) generally increase in the summer season. Cu and Pb accumulate preferentially in E. crassipes. The fish from these waters is unsuitable for human consumption as the levels of Cr, Cu and Pb are above the recommended limits. Significant spatial variations in parameters of water and sediments were confirmed via one-way analysis of variance. The Pearson’s correlation analysis suggests a common source of some of the metals. Principal component analysis highlighted domestic, and industrial waste and coal-fired thermal power plants as the metal sources. This study might act as a benchmark for other investigations focused on similarly affected surface aquatic systems due to agricultural and industrial activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)637-656
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry
Volume97
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017 May 28

Fingerprint

Trace Elements
Trace elements
Surface waters
trace elements
India
surface water
Eichhornia crassipes
Rivers
metals
trace element
Fish
sediments
Sediments
Fishes
rivers
Water
Metals
fish
metal
industrial wastes

Keywords

  • Water
  • fish
  • macrophytes
  • metal enrichment
  • multivariate statistical analysis
  • sediment

Cite this

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abstract = "This study reports the distribution of Cr, Ni, Cu and Pb in waters, sediments, macrophytes and fish of the Yamuna River’s patch in Delhi (India). This is one of the most polluted stretches of rivers in the world. Water from this river is used fosr irrigation, industrial and domestic purposes, including drinking water. The effects of season and anthropogenic practices were identified. Almost zero dissolved oxygen and high levels of lead and phosphate indicate the polluted state of the aquatic system. The enrichment factors in sediments (with respect to reference site) vary in the range of 0.60–82.9{\%} (Cr), 1.40–90.5{\%} (Ni), 1.00–85.3{\%} (Cu) and 3.80–86.6{\%} (Pb). The toxic effects due to Ni and Pb could frequently be visible in aquatic life as their values fall above the probable effect level (36 mg Kg−1 for Ni and 91.3 mg Kg−1 for Pb). The metal contents in the macrophyte (Eichhornia crassipes) and the fish (Oreochromis niloticus) generally increase in the summer season. Cu and Pb accumulate preferentially in E. crassipes. The fish from these waters is unsuitable for human consumption as the levels of Cr, Cu and Pb are above the recommended limits. Significant spatial variations in parameters of water and sediments were confirmed via one-way analysis of variance. The Pearson’s correlation analysis suggests a common source of some of the metals. Principal component analysis highlighted domestic, and industrial waste and coal-fired thermal power plants as the metal sources. This study might act as a benchmark for other investigations focused on similarly affected surface aquatic systems due to agricultural and industrial activities.",
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Distribution of trace elements in flowing surface waters : Effect of seasons and anthropogenic practices in India. / Kumar, Rahul; Rani, Manviri; Gupta, Himanshu; Gupta, Bina; Park, Daeryong; Jeon, Byong Hun.

In: International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 97, No. 7, 28.05.2017, p. 637-656.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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