Digestive system 2: Liver and biliary tract

Chun Ki Kim, Borys R. Krynyckyi, Josef MacHac

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cholescintigraphy plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of various biliary tract diseases, particularly when coupled with pharmacological intervention. The physician monitoring the study should be familiar with the most optimal technique for the pharmacological intervention and with conditions and medications that affect gall bladder contraction. It is also important to be aware of the various physiological and pharmacological effects on imaging findings, i.e., not only those findings that are normal but also the undesirable variants [253]. Failure to recognize such effects can lead to incorrect interpretation. Radionuclide imaging of the liver using the various tracers provides unique functional information, i.e., the functional reserve, presence or absence of hepatocytes/Kupffer's cells, and RBC pooling. This has been augmented further by the improved resolution with multi-head SPECT systems. Advances in instrumentation such as PET and development of new radiopharmaceuticals, including PET tracers specifically for the evaluation of the liver, will likely expand clinical applications further.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Pathophysiologic Basis of Nuclear Medicine
Subtitle of host publicationSecond Edition
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages419-447
Number of pages29
ISBN (Print)3540239928, 9783540239925
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Digestive System
Biliary Tract
Pharmacology
Liver
Biliary Tract Diseases
Kupffer Cells
Radiopharmaceuticals
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Radionuclide Imaging
Hepatocytes
Urinary Bladder
Head
Physicians

Cite this

Kim, C. K., Krynyckyi, B. R., & MacHac, J. (2006). Digestive system 2: Liver and biliary tract. In The Pathophysiologic Basis of Nuclear Medicine: Second Edition (pp. 419-447). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-47953-6_17
Kim, Chun Ki ; Krynyckyi, Borys R. ; MacHac, Josef. / Digestive system 2 : Liver and biliary tract. The Pathophysiologic Basis of Nuclear Medicine: Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2006. pp. 419-447
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Kim, CK, Krynyckyi, BR & MacHac, J 2006, Digestive system 2: Liver and biliary tract. in The Pathophysiologic Basis of Nuclear Medicine: Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 419-447. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-47953-6_17

Digestive system 2 : Liver and biliary tract. / Kim, Chun Ki; Krynyckyi, Borys R.; MacHac, Josef.

The Pathophysiologic Basis of Nuclear Medicine: Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2006. p. 419-447.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Kim CK, Krynyckyi BR, MacHac J. Digestive system 2: Liver and biliary tract. In The Pathophysiologic Basis of Nuclear Medicine: Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2006. p. 419-447 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-47953-6_17