Different perception levels of histamine-induced itch sensation in young adult mice

Yeounjung Ji, Yongwoo Jang, Wook Joo Lee, Young Duk Yang, Won Sik Shim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Itch is an unpleasant sensation that evokes behavioral responses such as scratching the skin. Interestingly, it is conceived that the perception of itch sensation is influenced by age. Indeed, accumulating evidence supports the idea that even children or younger adults show distinctive itch sensation depending on age. This evidence implies the presence of a mechanism that regulates the perception of itch sensation in an age-dependent fashion. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate a putative mechanism for the age-dependent perception of itch sensation by comparing histamine-induced scratching behaviors in 45-day old (D45) and 75-day old male “young adult” mice. The results indicated that, following histamine administration, the D75 mice spent a longer time scratching than D45 mice. However, the intensity of the calcium influx induced by histamine in primary culture of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons was not different between D45 and D75 mice. Moreover, no apparent difference was observed in mRNA levels of a characteristic His-related receptor and ion channel. In contrast, the mRNA levels of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) were increased approximately by two-fold in D75 DRG compared with D45 DRG. Additionally, D75-derived DRG neurons exhibited enhanced intracellular calcium increase by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a TLR4 agonist) than those of D45 mice. Furthermore, intensities of calcium influx induced by histamine were significantly potentiated when co-treated with LPS in D75 DRG neurons, but not in those of D45 mice. Thus, it appears that D75 mice showed enhanced histamine-induced scratching behaviors not by increased expression levels of histamine-related genes, but probably due to augmented TLR4 expression in DRG neurons. Consequently, the current study found that different perception levels of histamine-induced itch sensation are present in different age groups of young adult mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-193
Number of pages6
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume188
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018 May 1

Fingerprint

Histamine
Young Adult
Spinal Ganglia
Toll-Like Receptor 4
Neurons
Calcium
Messenger RNA
Ion Channels
Lipopolysaccharides
Age Groups
Skin
Genes

Keywords

  • Histamine
  • Itch sensation
  • Scratching
  • Young adult mouse

Cite this

Ji, Yeounjung ; Jang, Yongwoo ; Lee, Wook Joo ; Yang, Young Duk ; Shim, Won Sik. / Different perception levels of histamine-induced itch sensation in young adult mice. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 188. pp. 188-193.
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Different perception levels of histamine-induced itch sensation in young adult mice. / Ji, Yeounjung; Jang, Yongwoo; Lee, Wook Joo; Yang, Young Duk; Shim, Won Sik.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 188, 01.05.2018, p. 188-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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