Detection of concealed information: combining a virtual mock crime with a P300-based Guilty Knowledge Test.

Jinsun Hahm, Hyung Ki Ji, Je Young Jeong, Dong Hoon Oh, Seok Hyeon Kim, Kwee Bo Sim, Jang Han Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the detection of concealed information by combining a virtual mock crime with a P300-based Guilty Knowledge Test (GKT). Thirty-eight male participants were assigned to one of two groups: a guilty group that committed a mock crime to conceal a lost roll of bills in a computer simulation of a virtual library and an innocent group that was free from concealed information. Remarkably, the guilty group reacted with stronger P300 peak amplitudes to crime-relevant than to irrelevant stimuli, whereas the innocent group had similar P300 responses between crime-relevant and irrelevant stimuli. Deception-related cognitive activity based on P300 was revealed as a valid marker to differentiate between guilty and innocent. This is a highly empirical study combining a virtual mock crime with a P300-based GKT to detect deception. These results may be applied to a variety of areas dealing with not only forensic investigation but also health and medical research concerning deception as a symptom.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-275
Number of pages7
JournalCyberpsychology & behavior : the impact of the Internet, multimedia and virtual reality on behavior and society
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009 Jan 1

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Crime
offense
Deception
Group
stimulus
Digital Libraries
medical research
computer simulation
bill
Computer Simulation
Biomedical Research
Health
Computer simulation
health

Cite this

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Detection of concealed information : combining a virtual mock crime with a P300-based Guilty Knowledge Test. / Hahm, Jinsun; Ji, Hyung Ki; Jeong, Je Young; Oh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seok Hyeon; Sim, Kwee Bo; Lee, Jang Han.

In: Cyberpsychology & behavior : the impact of the Internet, multimedia and virtual reality on behavior and society, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.01.2009, p. 269-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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