Child Temperament Moderates Effects of Parent-Child Mutuality on Self-Regulation: A Relationship-Based Path for Emotionally Negative Infants

Sanghag Kim, Grazyna Kochanska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined infants' negative emotionality as moderating the effect of parent-child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) on children's self-regulation (n=102). Negative emotionality was observed in anger-eliciting episodes and in interactions with parents at 7months. MRO was coded in naturalistic interactions at 15months. Self-regulation was measured at 25months in effortful control battery and as self-regulated compliance to parental requests and prohibitions. Negative emotionality moderated the effects of mother-child, but not father-child, MRO. Highly negative infants were less self-regulated when they were in unresponsive relationships (low MRO), but more self-regulated when in responsive relationships (high MRO). For infants not prone to negative emotionality, there was no link between MRO and self-regulation. The "regions of significance" analysis supported the differential susceptibility model not the diathesis-stress model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1275-1289
Number of pages15
JournalChild Development
Volume83
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012 Jul 1

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