Association between diet and gallstones of cholesterol and pigment among patients with cholecystectomy: A case-control study in Korea

Yongsoon Park, Doyeon Kim, Ju Seon Lee, Yu Na Kim, Yoon Kyung Jeong, Kyeong Geun Lee, Dongho Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of cholesterol gallstones is high in Western populations, while pigment gallstones are common in Asian populations. Dietary factors are suggested to be associated with gallstone risk, but their relationship with gallstone type has not been evaluated. This study investigated the association between diet and risk of cholesterol gallstone or pigment gallstone in a Korean population whose dietary pattern and type of gallstone were changed during the last 30.years. Methods: Patients with cholesterol (n = 40) and pigment (n = 59) gallstones were recruited after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and were compared with those of age- and sex-matched controls without gallstones (n = 99). Dietary intakes were assessed by trained dietitians using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to examine the associations between diet and risk for type of gallstones adjusted by potential confounders. Results: Patients with cholesterol gallstone consumed more lipid, animal lipid, beef, pork, and fried food than those with pigment gallstones and control, while patients with pigment gallstone consumed more carbohydrate and noodles than patients with cholesterol gallstone and control. In multinomial logistic regression analysis using control as reference group, dietary pattern with high consumption of beef, pork, and fried food was associated with risk of cholesterol gallstones, while there was no association between the risk of pigment gallstone and dietary pattern. In addition, control consumed more alcohol than patients with cholesterol and pigment gallstones. Conclusions: The present study suggested consumption of fat from meat and fried foods increased the risk of cholesterol gallstone, and intake of carbohydrate from noodles increased the risk of pigment gallstone.

Original languageEnglish
Article number39
JournalJournal of Health, Population and Nutrition
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017 Nov 23

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cholelithiasis
Cholecystectomy
Gallstones
Korea
case-control studies
Korean Peninsula
Case-Control Studies
pigments
Cholesterol
cholesterol
Diet
diet
fried foods
eating habits
Food
noodles
pork
beef
regression analysis
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Cholecystectomy
  • Cholesterol gallstone
  • Diet
  • Korean
  • Pigment gallstone

Cite this

@article{7c918b86169f44aea6e4c59075763929,
title = "Association between diet and gallstones of cholesterol and pigment among patients with cholecystectomy: A case-control study in Korea",
abstract = "Background: The prevalence of cholesterol gallstones is high in Western populations, while pigment gallstones are common in Asian populations. Dietary factors are suggested to be associated with gallstone risk, but their relationship with gallstone type has not been evaluated. This study investigated the association between diet and risk of cholesterol gallstone or pigment gallstone in a Korean population whose dietary pattern and type of gallstone were changed during the last 30.years. Methods: Patients with cholesterol (n = 40) and pigment (n = 59) gallstones were recruited after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and were compared with those of age- and sex-matched controls without gallstones (n = 99). Dietary intakes were assessed by trained dietitians using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals to examine the associations between diet and risk for type of gallstones adjusted by potential confounders. Results: Patients with cholesterol gallstone consumed more lipid, animal lipid, beef, pork, and fried food than those with pigment gallstones and control, while patients with pigment gallstone consumed more carbohydrate and noodles than patients with cholesterol gallstone and control. In multinomial logistic regression analysis using control as reference group, dietary pattern with high consumption of beef, pork, and fried food was associated with risk of cholesterol gallstones, while there was no association between the risk of pigment gallstone and dietary pattern. In addition, control consumed more alcohol than patients with cholesterol and pigment gallstones. Conclusions: The present study suggested consumption of fat from meat and fried foods increased the risk of cholesterol gallstone, and intake of carbohydrate from noodles increased the risk of pigment gallstone.",
keywords = "Cholecystectomy, Cholesterol gallstone, Diet, Korean, Pigment gallstone",
author = "Yongsoon Park and Doyeon Kim and Lee, {Ju Seon} and Kim, {Yu Na} and Jeong, {Yoon Kyung} and Lee, {Kyeong Geun} and Dongho Choi",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1186/s41043-017-0116-y",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
journal = "Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition",
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Association between diet and gallstones of cholesterol and pigment among patients with cholecystectomy : A case-control study in Korea. / Park, Yongsoon; Kim, Doyeon; Lee, Ju Seon; Kim, Yu Na; Jeong, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Kyeong Geun; Choi, Dongho.

In: Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, Vol. 36, No. 1, 39, 23.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between diet and gallstones of cholesterol and pigment among patients with cholecystectomy

T2 - A case-control study in Korea

AU - Park, Yongsoon

AU - Kim, Doyeon

AU - Lee, Ju Seon

AU - Kim, Yu Na

AU - Jeong, Yoon Kyung

AU - Lee, Kyeong Geun

AU - Choi, Dongho

PY - 2017/11/23

Y1 - 2017/11/23

N2 - Background: The prevalence of cholesterol gallstones is high in Western populations, while pigment gallstones are common in Asian populations. Dietary factors are suggested to be associated with gallstone risk, but their relationship with gallstone type has not been evaluated. This study investigated the association between diet and risk of cholesterol gallstone or pigment gallstone in a Korean population whose dietary pattern and type of gallstone were changed during the last 30.years. Methods: Patients with cholesterol (n = 40) and pigment (n = 59) gallstones were recruited after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and were compared with those of age- and sex-matched controls without gallstones (n = 99). Dietary intakes were assessed by trained dietitians using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to examine the associations between diet and risk for type of gallstones adjusted by potential confounders. Results: Patients with cholesterol gallstone consumed more lipid, animal lipid, beef, pork, and fried food than those with pigment gallstones and control, while patients with pigment gallstone consumed more carbohydrate and noodles than patients with cholesterol gallstone and control. In multinomial logistic regression analysis using control as reference group, dietary pattern with high consumption of beef, pork, and fried food was associated with risk of cholesterol gallstones, while there was no association between the risk of pigment gallstone and dietary pattern. In addition, control consumed more alcohol than patients with cholesterol and pigment gallstones. Conclusions: The present study suggested consumption of fat from meat and fried foods increased the risk of cholesterol gallstone, and intake of carbohydrate from noodles increased the risk of pigment gallstone.

AB - Background: The prevalence of cholesterol gallstones is high in Western populations, while pigment gallstones are common in Asian populations. Dietary factors are suggested to be associated with gallstone risk, but their relationship with gallstone type has not been evaluated. This study investigated the association between diet and risk of cholesterol gallstone or pigment gallstone in a Korean population whose dietary pattern and type of gallstone were changed during the last 30.years. Methods: Patients with cholesterol (n = 40) and pigment (n = 59) gallstones were recruited after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and were compared with those of age- and sex-matched controls without gallstones (n = 99). Dietary intakes were assessed by trained dietitians using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to examine the associations between diet and risk for type of gallstones adjusted by potential confounders. Results: Patients with cholesterol gallstone consumed more lipid, animal lipid, beef, pork, and fried food than those with pigment gallstones and control, while patients with pigment gallstone consumed more carbohydrate and noodles than patients with cholesterol gallstone and control. In multinomial logistic regression analysis using control as reference group, dietary pattern with high consumption of beef, pork, and fried food was associated with risk of cholesterol gallstones, while there was no association between the risk of pigment gallstone and dietary pattern. In addition, control consumed more alcohol than patients with cholesterol and pigment gallstones. Conclusions: The present study suggested consumption of fat from meat and fried foods increased the risk of cholesterol gallstone, and intake of carbohydrate from noodles increased the risk of pigment gallstone.

KW - Cholecystectomy

KW - Cholesterol gallstone

KW - Diet

KW - Korean

KW - Pigment gallstone

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U2 - 10.1186/s41043-017-0116-y

DO - 10.1186/s41043-017-0116-y

M3 - Article

C2 - 29169372

AN - SCOPUS:85035199210

VL - 36

JO - Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition

JF - Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition

SN - 1606-0997

IS - 1

M1 - 39

ER -