Acetoclastic methanogenesis led by Methanosarcina in anaerobic co-digestion of fats, oil and grease for enhanced production of methane

Mayur B. Kurade, Shouvik Saha, El Sayed Salama, Swapnil M. Patil, Sanjay Prabhu Govindwar, Byong-Hun Jeon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fats, oil and grease (FOG) are energy-dense wastes that substantially increase biomethane recovery. Shifts in the microbial community during anaerobic co-digestion of FOG was assessed to understand relationships between substrate digestion and microbial adaptations. Excessive addition of FOG inhibited the methanogenic activity during initial phase; however, it enhanced the ultimate methane production by 217% compared to the control. The dominance of Proteobacteria was decreased with a simultaneous increase in Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Synergistetes and Euryarchaeota during the co-digestion. A significant increase in Syntrophomonas (0.18–11%), Sporanaerobacter (0.14–6%) and Propionispira (0.02–19%) was observed during co-digestion, which substantiated their importance in acetogenesis. Among methanogenic Archaea, the dominance of Methanosaeta (94%) at the beginning of co-digestion was gradually replaced by Methanosarcina (0.52–95%). The absence/relatively low abundance of syntrophic acetate oxidizers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and dominance of acetoclastic methanogens suggested that methane generation during co-digestion of FOG was predominantly conducted through acetoclastic pathway led by Methanosarcina.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-359
Number of pages9
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume272
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Methane
methanogenesis
Lubricating greases
Oils and fats
fat
digestion
methane
Methanogens
oil
Acetates
Recovery
microbial community
acetate
Substrates
substrate
energy

Keywords

  • Anaerobic co-digestion
  • Fats, oil and grease (FOG)
  • High-throughput sequencing
  • Long-chain fatty acids
  • Methanosaeta
  • Methanosarcina

Cite this

@article{7e95d9ac7880444faeca48fe5dfab75c,
title = "Acetoclastic methanogenesis led by Methanosarcina in anaerobic co-digestion of fats, oil and grease for enhanced production of methane",
abstract = "Fats, oil and grease (FOG) are energy-dense wastes that substantially increase biomethane recovery. Shifts in the microbial community during anaerobic co-digestion of FOG was assessed to understand relationships between substrate digestion and microbial adaptations. Excessive addition of FOG inhibited the methanogenic activity during initial phase; however, it enhanced the ultimate methane production by 217{\%} compared to the control. The dominance of Proteobacteria was decreased with a simultaneous increase in Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Synergistetes and Euryarchaeota during the co-digestion. A significant increase in Syntrophomonas (0.18–11{\%}), Sporanaerobacter (0.14–6{\%}) and Propionispira (0.02–19{\%}) was observed during co-digestion, which substantiated their importance in acetogenesis. Among methanogenic Archaea, the dominance of Methanosaeta (94{\%}) at the beginning of co-digestion was gradually replaced by Methanosarcina (0.52–95{\%}). The absence/relatively low abundance of syntrophic acetate oxidizers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and dominance of acetoclastic methanogens suggested that methane generation during co-digestion of FOG was predominantly conducted through acetoclastic pathway led by Methanosarcina.",
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author = "Kurade, {Mayur B.} and Shouvik Saha and Salama, {El Sayed} and Patil, {Swapnil M.} and Govindwar, {Sanjay Prabhu} and Byong-Hun Jeon",
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Acetoclastic methanogenesis led by Methanosarcina in anaerobic co-digestion of fats, oil and grease for enhanced production of methane. / Kurade, Mayur B.; Saha, Shouvik; Salama, El Sayed; Patil, Swapnil M.; Govindwar, Sanjay Prabhu; Jeon, Byong-Hun.

In: Bioresource Technology, Vol. 272, 01.01.2019, p. 351-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acetoclastic methanogenesis led by Methanosarcina in anaerobic co-digestion of fats, oil and grease for enhanced production of methane

AU - Kurade, Mayur B.

AU - Saha, Shouvik

AU - Salama, El Sayed

AU - Patil, Swapnil M.

AU - Govindwar, Sanjay Prabhu

AU - Jeon, Byong-Hun

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Fats, oil and grease (FOG) are energy-dense wastes that substantially increase biomethane recovery. Shifts in the microbial community during anaerobic co-digestion of FOG was assessed to understand relationships between substrate digestion and microbial adaptations. Excessive addition of FOG inhibited the methanogenic activity during initial phase; however, it enhanced the ultimate methane production by 217% compared to the control. The dominance of Proteobacteria was decreased with a simultaneous increase in Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Synergistetes and Euryarchaeota during the co-digestion. A significant increase in Syntrophomonas (0.18–11%), Sporanaerobacter (0.14–6%) and Propionispira (0.02–19%) was observed during co-digestion, which substantiated their importance in acetogenesis. Among methanogenic Archaea, the dominance of Methanosaeta (94%) at the beginning of co-digestion was gradually replaced by Methanosarcina (0.52–95%). The absence/relatively low abundance of syntrophic acetate oxidizers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and dominance of acetoclastic methanogens suggested that methane generation during co-digestion of FOG was predominantly conducted through acetoclastic pathway led by Methanosarcina.

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KW - High-throughput sequencing

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